Baby center

12 reason baby cry and how to soothe them

In this article


  • Hunger
  • Stomach problems from colic gas
  • needs tp burp
  • needs sleep
  • wants to be held
  • Too cold or too hot
  • Something painful and hard to notice
  • Teething pain
  • Wants less stimulation
  • Wants more stimulation
  • Not feeling well
  • There's no getting around it: Babies cry. It's how they communicate hunger, pain, fear, the need to sleep, and more. So how are you supposed to know exactly what your baby is trying to tell you? It can be tricky to interpret your child's cries, especially at first.

    Here are the most common reasons babies cry:

  • Hunger
  • This is probably the first thing you think of when your baby cries. Learning to recognize the signs of hunger will help you start feeding your baby before the crying stage. Some hunger signs to watch for in newborns include fussing, lip smacking, rooting (a newborn reflex that makes babies turn their head toward your hand when you stroke their cheek), and putting their hands to their mouth.

  • Stomach problems from colic and gas
  • Tummy troubles associated with gas or colic can lead to lots of crying. The rather mysterious condition known as colic is usually described as inconsolable crying for at least three hours a day, at least three days a week, at least three weeks in a row. For more help, learn helpful strategies for soothing a colicky baby. If your baby often fusses and cries right after being fed, she may have some sort of tummy pain. Many parents swear by over-the-counter anti-gas drops for babies or gripe water (made from herbs and sodium bicarbonate), though neither has been proven to be effective. Get your doctor's okay before using either of these.


  • A dirty diaper
  • Some babies let you know right away when they need to be changed. Others can tolerate a dirty diaper for quite a while. Either way, this one is easy to check and simple to remedy.

  • Needs Sleep
  • It seems like tired babies should simply be able to go to sleep, anytime, anywhere. But it's harder for them than you might realize. Instead of nodding off easily, babies may fuss and cry – especially when they're overtired. "We thought our daughter was colicky for the first five weeks of life, until we read about how babies get really cranky if they're exhausted. After we started putting her to sleep as soon as she yawned the first time (at any time of the day), she cried a lot less and had fewer problems with gas." "I've noticed that if my baby starts crying after being played with, fed, and changed, and she's been up for a while, she is overtired! I just hold her close, talk to her in a soft voice, and let her cry. She doesn't cry hard when I hold her like that. She makes funny fussy noises with her eyes closed. Before long, she's sound asleep." "A loud 'shhhhhh' sound works incredibly well. I had to make a recording because I was getting lightheaded from doing it so much for my daughter. My recording lasts for 48 minutes, and it works every time!" "My 2 1/2-month-old is so interested in everything that she doesn't want to stop being part of the action by falling asleep. Yet she's tired and cranky at the same time. Minimizing sensory input sometimes helps her feel like she's not 'missing something' by settling down. (And then there are the times when she's just going to cry no matter what I do.)"

  • Too cold or too hot
  • If your baby feels chilly, like when you remove her clothes to change a diaper or clean her bottom with a cold wipe, she may protest by crying. Newborns like to be bundled up and kept warm – but not too warm. As a rule, they're comfortable wearing one more layer than you need to be comfortable. Babies are less likely to complain about being too warm than about being too cold, and they won't cry about it as vigorously

  • Teething Pain
  • Teething can be painful as each new tooth pushes through tender young gums. Some babies suffer more than others, but all are likely to be fussy and tearful from teething at some point. If your baby seems to be in pain and you're not sure why, try feeling his gums with your finger. You may be surprised to discover the hard nub of an emerging baby tooth. (On average, the first tooth breaks through between 4 and 7 months, but it can happen earlier.)